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Vintage sportswear: Could these looks still cause a racket?

August 7, 2012 | By Helene Gustavsson | Archive, Entertainment, Trends

Fashion influences sport and vice versa, so with the Olympics now in full swing, there is no better time for a stylistic look back at sportswear.

We’ve been pouring over inspiring images of professionals, celebrities and models all drawn to the wonderful world of sport — as in the stunning pictures by LIFE photographer Gjon Mili or Charles Hewitt in which fashion and sport blend perfectly together.

Sportswear was, of course, invented by the Americans, popularized in the 1920’s and has never ceased to influence trends. But no tracksuits please…

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Images in slider include:

1. Woman playing badminton, 1944.  (Photo by Gjon Mili, Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

2. A woman modelling women’s fashions in a studio portrait, wearing a white knitted jumper featuring a motif of two tennis racquets and red tennis balls on the front, also wearing a white visor and a red cravat with white polka dots, 1973. (Photo by Archive Photos/Getty Images)

3. American actress Farrah Fawcett (then known as Farrah Fawcett-Majors) poses with a tennis racket outside the Playboy Mansion where she participated in a charity tennis match, Los Angeles, California, May 1976. (Photo by Fotos International/Frank Edwards/Getty Images)

 

Editor’s note:  London-based Helene Gustavsson works with picture research at Getty Images and is one of the editors for the ‘Of the Moment’ blog. With a particular interest in fashion and social history she edits the weekly Getty Images e-mail feature “Style Now and Then,” looking at both contemporary trends and the inspiration from the past behind them.

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