Innovation and imagery – What would Ernst Haas think of 360?

January 25, 2012 | By Getty Images | Archive, Creative, Technology

When we heard the news that Tamaggo’s 360 degree consumer camera may be available for purchase later this year, it immediately got us thinking about Ernst Haas, and how, for his time, his innovations in color photography were amazing, powerful and, above all, groundbreaking.

We’re honored to feature Haas’s work in our Masters Collection, as well as in this podcast in which our own VP, Hulton Archive Matt Butson talks to Haas’s son, Alex Haas, about his father’s pioneering the world of color photography.

“[Ernst Haas's pure artistic side] was way ahead of its time,” Alex says in the interview. “And it’s only now being understood and discovered.”  

So when we look back on 2012 and those pioneers of 360 imagery — stills and video (we have the infrastructure to make 360 happen, by the way), what will we say? Or, better yet, what do you think the future holds? Leave a comment and let us know.

[bra_slider w=650 h=426]Ernst-Haas-Nebuta Festival-1985-Ernst-Haas-Getty-Images-3433314Ernst-Haas-matador-1960-Ernst-Haas-Getty-Images-3162601Ernst-Haas-1960-Bird Pattern--Ernst-Haas-Getty-Images-3141426Ernst-Haas-abalone-shell-1986-Ernst-Haas-Getty-Images-3436561Ernst-Haas-Johannesburg-1954-Ernst-Haas-Getty-Images-3436040[/bra_slider]

 

Slideshow images include:

Image 1 – August 1985: An illuminated papier-mache float in the Nebuta Festival held in Aomori city at the beginning of August showing stylised faces. The Nebuta festival parade, which allegedly has 7th century roots, celebrates the fight for the area between two war lords. (Photo by Ernst Haas/Ernst Haas/Getty Images)

Image 2 – Circa 1960: A matador twirls his red cape to confuse the bull during a Spanish bullfight. (Photo by Ernst Haas/Ernst Haas/Getty Images)

Image 3 – 1960: A tear in the vivid red and black pattern of a poster in New York City. Colour Photography book. (Photo by Ernst Haas/Ernst Haas/Getty Images)

Image 4 – September 1986: Reflections in an abalone shell in Maine. (Photo by Ernst Haas/Ernst Haas/Getty Images)

Image 5 – 1954: Johannesburg skyline against a mountain of earth dug from a gold mine. (Photo by Ernst Haas/Ernst Haas/Getty Images)

 

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  • http://www.traderswarehouse.co.uk/ Stanley Davies

    Technology has improved so vastly in the recent years that more and more features and power are packed into a camera. Specifications that would only be found in professional models of cameras can now be found in an entry level DSLR, and that has enabled more people to take better photos.

  • http://www.webrotate360.com/ Mark Azo

    Just recently saw a throwable 360 panoramic ball camera in the shape of a ball covered in rubber and I guess it is crash resistant – makes it possible to get 3D pictures from altitudes and locations otherwise wouldn’t be possible. That’s one example. Then all these new gadgets for iPhone that let you get 3D or 360 photos or videos in one shot or via controlled rotation (Bubble Scope and Galileo). It’s going to be a whole new way of digital imaging.. not flat any longer!

  • http://www.virtualsweden.se jonas

    When will Getty start licensing interactive 360 content?